Autumn Princess, Dragon Child (Tale of Shikanoko #2) by Lian Hearn

Posted: April 7, 2017 in Book Review
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

shika2

“He sleeps beneath the lake,
The dragon child,
But he will wake
And spread his wings again,
When the deer’s child comes.”

Sounds so peaceful, right? Pastoral, almost.

But the Tale of Shikanoko is a bloody game of thrones inspired by medieval Japan and told in riveting, heartbreaking fashion.

About :

If you haven’t read book I or at least my review of book I, my recap of the plot won’t make much sense because there’s sooo much going in this series. Lian Hearn’s spare style allows for constant action, and the politics of the large cast is fairly complex, so if I try to recap every important plot line, my entire review will be one long recap and you won’t need to read the book anymore!

But here’s the short version of volumes 1-2:

An impostor prince sits on the Lotus throne and the Heavens take out their vengeance on all as the true emperor hides his identity from his scheming enemies. Shikanoko, The Deer’s Child of the prophecy, retreats to the magician Shisoku to mend his broken deer mask, following a humbling magical defeat by the Prince Abbot. While there, his heart softens toward a dangerous new threat, the five Spider Tribe demon children birthed by the Lady Tora. But despite the chaos all around him, all Shikanoko can think about is the true child emperor and his guardian, the lovely Autumn Princess…Autumn Princess, Dragon Child is an adult fantasy written by Lian Hearn and published June 7th 2016 by FSG Originals. Paperback, 288 pages.

Thoughts :

“The Tale of Shikanoko” series contains four volumes, but it’s really one long story published in four installments. FSG Originals published all four in quick succession in 2016. I read the first installment back in August 2016, so I worried about keeping track of the large cast after so many months; but with a little patience and piecing together, I was able to pick up the story again. I do, however, recommend reading them all within a shorter space of time than I did.

As in volume one, the main form of currency in volume two is power. Although the women vary in motivation and personality, the men all ruthlessly take power to protect themselves and their own families and tend to blend together to some degree. (I felt the same way about the genders in Across the Nightingale Floor, Tales of the Otori #1; but my antipathy toward the bland male characters in that earlier book was much stronger. I do find the characters in The Tale of Shikanoko much more interesting, as a whole, as well as finding the larger plot and style much improved.) But Hearn has a way of changing my mind about seemingly-irredeemable primary and secondary characters. I always end up caring about them by the end.

Shikanoko’s character develops in particularly interesting ways. His defeat at the end of book one broke him, and during the course of book two, he starts to grow from used child to adult warrior/sorcerer. His new humility proves to be a strength, by the end of this volume. His character development is one of my favorite things about the story.

Each volume ends with a monumental choice by Shikanoko—usually a combination of glorious victory and terrible mistake—and each time this poignant victory/defeat has made me eager to to pick up the next installment (although I didn’t get the chance to do that after volume one). Many readers have concluded that combining Shika’s story into one large volume would have made more sense, since the four small volumes (all well under 300 pgs, extremely short for adult fantasy) have very little in the way of self-contained plots. But regardless of this publishing model, the story is just as compelling in one or four volumes.

Overall :

So far The Tale of Shikanoko series is very dark and very adult, nothing like what I remember from Across the Nightingale Floor. I’m completely hooked!

Plot: 3.5/5
Characters: 4/5
Writing: 5/5
Worldbuilding: 4/5

****4/5 STARS

Recommended To :

If you enjoy literary fantasy and Asian settings (specifically feudal Japan, in this case), I highly recommend this series. Not recommended to readers wanting fast, action-oriented or “magic-systems” fantasy; though the spare, impactful style never wastes a word, the tale’s emphasis on character and political machinations leaves little room for action or humor. And although magic exists and influences the story in interesting ways, it remains completely mysterious to readers, used for atmospheric and structural elements.

The opinions I share are completely my own and in no way compensated for by publishers or authors. Thank you so much to Lian Hearn, FSG Originals and Netgalley for my free review copy! I loved it.

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Comments
  1. Tammy says:

    I love stories that revolve around Japan and its history (I lived in Japan for a year so it’s a special place). The cover makes this feel like a light sort of read, but I guess it’s deceiving!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christy Luis says:

      You lived in Japan!? That’s so cool, I’m totally jealous!! You’re right, the cover does make it look like a fun story, maybe with a dragon mentor or something. It’s like PSYCH! Lol

      Like

  2. I’ve read a couple books by Hearn before, but they were middle grade and I’m curious about some of her work for older readers. So, I’d like to try this series at one point. I had no idea of the book’s unique structure until your review though! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christy Luis says:

      Yeah, this is really different from the only other book of hers I’ve read! The other felt much mellower, so perhaps it was the same series you read. This one is a loooot darker Lol. But it’s perfect, I love it! I hope you do get the chance to try it sometime 😀

      Like

  3. This is the first time I hear about this series, and I’m intrigued! Japanese-like-themed fantasy is something of a rarity: the only similar example I can quote is Daniel Abraham’s Long Price Quartet, and since I loved that series, I have a suspicion I might enjoy this one as well…
    Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christy Luis says:

      I wish there was more, too. I read a strongly Japanese ya fantasy last year (A Mortal Song by Megan Crewe), but I think that’s all I’ve run across, other than Lian Hearn’s wonderful stuff. Thank you so much for mentioning the Long Price quartet; I’ll definitely check that out! I just added it to my tbr 😀

      Liked by 1 person

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